How to Master The Follow Up Interview Like A Girlboss

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Scoring the first interview is a huge win. They picked your résumé out of the heaping pile and decided you were worth their time for an interview. Then, you put on your power outfit and aced the first round. You get the email from HR saying that they want you to come in for a follow up interview. After you happy dance around your room, you can't help but panic. What now? What do you say in the second round interview that makes them say, Yes! She is the girl our team needs? What does it take to land the job? Don't worry, we have you covered.

So this is how the process goes: the initial interview is where you prove yourself to the company.

You talk about your skills, experiences, and why you are fit for the job. It's usually with someone from the human resources department. This your opportunity to show the company what you're made of. The follow up interview is a more even playing field while also being more challenging. This is a chance for you to really think about whether or not this position is a good fit for you. However, it's also typically with a manager from the department that you applied to, meaning they'll be asking you more technical, specific questions rather than questions to assess your personality.

The Feminist Financier, emphasized that a crucial question that you must be able to answer is, "why should we hire you?" Start by detailing your skills and experiences, linking these to the company's goals and showing how the two relate. Conclude by adding some more personal information and providing proof, like references or examples on your résumé. In most second round interviews, especially if it's for a job that requires a tangible skillset, the interviewer will likely ask you to apply your talents. That could be through case questions, guided exercises, and timed tests. Be prepared for those questions because if you don't pass them, there's a high likelihood you'll automatically be eliminated from their consideration.

And then there's the big question: are they the right fit for you?

The Balance advises deciding what is a priority for you. Do that beforehand. It's obvious that your work situation has a significant impact on your life. You want to make sure that this company is a good fit for you as well. That requires quality time reflecting on your priorities. Ask questions about things like dress code, work space, work/life balance, your schedule, whatever matters to you. Your work and your life should have a symbiotic relationship, not clashing into each other and causing you stress.

That being said, keep in mind that when it comes to entry level positions, there is little room for entitlement. That's a one way ticket to rejection. Ask questions with humility, confidence, and intelligence.

The final key to nailing an interview is finishing on a strong note.

According to Forbes, the key to leaving on a positive note is for you to ask about what the next step in the hiring process looks like. You'll know when to hear back from people or if you will need to call them back. Once you're gone, send some type of thank you correspondence.

Some say that a handwritten letter is better, while some say that an email will suffice. The important part is to reach out and say thank you. Definitely consider sending an email first, since that shows your promptness.

Over the following weeks, check-in periodically. Don't send, for example, 15 emails in the span of five days. However, an appropriate amount of communication shows that you are interested in the job and this is a priority for you.

At the end of the day, you need go in feeling confident and secure in yourself and your abilities.

That self-love is what is going to propel you further in the process. Of course you'll be nervous, but that's completely normal. Walk in knowing that you scored that follow up interview because you deserve it. The accumulation of your hard work, accomplishments, contributions, poise, and personality went into that choice. You have a unique gift to bring to a company and to the greater world. So go ace that follow up interview, girl. You got this.